Stay home and knit or crochet!

Spring has sprung, and in normal seasons we round up our favourite new patterns for you to knit and crochet. Since we’re all staying home to help flatten the curve, we figured this was the perfect time to pull together those lovely new patterns to inspire you. We hope you’ll find something here to spark your knitting or crocheting mojo and get you working from your stash or supporting your local yarn stores!

Tops and Tees

Spring is here and summer is coming – time to make some new new tops and tees for the season! The Rosewater Tee by Black Cat Knitting Company is a modern take on a classic retro style top with a comfortable fit and dramatically tapered ribbed waistline; knit it up in your favourite fingering weight yarn. The Highbury Halter by Jiminez Joseph is designed to be loose and flowing around the hips, with a nice curve at the hem and looks perfect for those warm summer evenings. We’ve fallen in love with Olivine by Estefania Espindola in the latest issue of Knitscene, as it seems like a great piece for layering, and is knit in an easy-to-memorize lace mesh pattern. Green Machine by Amy Gundersen, a FREE pattern in the most recent issue of Knitty magazine, takes only one or two skeins of laceweight yarn. The Nicole Tank by Kate Oates is full of simple, easy to memorize A-line lace paired with a fitted bodice, a combination made for mild climates and warmer months everywhere, perfect all by itself or for layering. And for the crocheters, check out the stunning Dusk Camisole by Jane Howorth from the newest issue of We Crochet Magazine.

1

Shawls

Spring and summer are all about light and airy knits, and there’s nothing better for that than a shawl project! Cattedrale by Valentina Cosciani is a stunning asymmetrical shawl featuring an intuitive geometric all-over lace pattern, set off by a garter stitch border featured in the new issue of Making Stories Magazine. Far Away Dreams by Joji Locatelli is a simple rectangular wrap worked in garter stitch, surrounded by a delicate lace border. If you’re craving allover lace, check out Ceto by Barbara Benson, a completely new shawl shape with shaping that creates a triangle on one side (the beach) and pi shawl shaping to mimic the crashing waves building to a crescent on the other. Or if it’s more colour you’re after, check out Painting Bricks by Stephen West, a splashy semi-circular shawl worked in alternating sections of garter stitch and stockinette stitch stripes and slipped stitches. Or try Number 10 by Lori Versaci, an easy-to-knit garter stitch shawl, soothing to work and with extra interest as you watch the color play emerge. Wouldn’t either of these be great to use up leftovers from your stash? For our crocheters, check out Together Apart by Rachy Newin which was inspired by wide open spaces and the way we stay connected even when there’s physical distance.

2

Socks

Socks are the perfect portable project as you move from room to room or indoors and out. There are some spectacular new sock patterns for spring! Fern by Jill Zielinski is a twisted stitch sock pattern (no cables required!) echoing the green lines of ferns. Sweet & Tartan Socks by Tracie Millar are easier than they look – they’re crafted using mosaic knitting, meaning you’re only knitting one color at a time! If it’s texture you’re after, Carrots & Radishes Socks by Dawn Henderson have a playful basketweave punctuated by impish crossed cables, a nod to Mrs. Rabbit and Peter from A Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter. Paint Pan Socks by Wendy Staples are a tribute to her love of watercolors and can be worked in scraps from your stash. Ambient Socks by Helen Stewart are part of her third installment of the Handmade Sock Society; check out this one and her previous collections for beautifully elegant socks. And for our crocheters, check out Honeycomb Socks by A la Sascha for some stretchy and squishy slipper socks!

3

We hope you’ve found something here that inspires you to pull out your needles and hooks. We’ve also got Pinterest boards featuring our favourite knits and crochet if you need more ideas!

We’d love to see what you’re making while you’re at home. Tag us using the hashtag #eucalan on Instagram or share in our Facebook Group!

Like this post? Pin it!

Copy of Sweet Dreams Hat

Crafting and Laundering Baby Items with Eucalan

Did you know that Eucalan is delicate enough for everything your baby touches? Our formula is designed to be gentle on all that’s precious to you, whether that be your hand knit or crocheted items, lingerie, or the most precious: the items that surround your baby! Today we’ve pulled together a few of our favourite knitting and crochet patterns to celebrate your little one and keep them warm. We’ve also added our newest video on how to keep everything your baby touches clean and fresh with Eucalan, even when you’re on the go!

Sweaters

Winter is coming and we know you want to keep your little one warm in chilly temperatures! If you’re looking for something sweet and traditional, try the Norweigian Fir Top Down Cardigan by OGE Knitwear Designs. It doesn’t get cuter than the Teddy Bear Sweater by PetiteKnit for your littlest cub. Add some colourwork to your repertoire with Little Luminosity by Tanis Lavallee. Or gather up all your scraps and make them a fluffy Pengweeno by Stephen West. Check out this great use for all those stripey socks yarns: Little Sock Arms by Stephanie Lotven. And for our crocheters, what’s sweeter than this colourful Child Size Hooded Cardigan by Ashlea Konecny?

1
Hats

Keep your littlest ones warm with cozy hats! We love the free Garter Ear Flap Hat by Purl Soho; perfect for keeping those little ears safe from the cold! Or try your hand at cables with the I Heart Cables by Justyna Lorkowska. If you’ve got colour-changing yarn (or handspun!) check out the adorable Quynn by Woolly Wormhead. Add a little texture to a plain hat with Gather by Tin Can Knits (and check out their other free patterns). If crochet is your craft, we love the Big Heart Slouch Beanie by Phanessa Fong. Or get colourful with the Babala Hat by Mamachee!

2

Lovies

Are you looking for a lovey for your littlest love? There are some super sweet patterns on Ravelry and these are our favourites! Look how cuddly and soft the Sweetie Bear Lovey by Ariane Gallizzi is! Or check out all the bunnies and their fun outfits like Bunny Girl in a Dotty Dress by Little Cotton Rabbits. Littles love dinosaurs and Little Dino by Susan B. Anderson is sure to please. Or have some monstrous fun with Bonk by Susan Claudino-Aguilar. Who doesn’t need a Ragdoll Unicorn by Spin A Yarn Crochet? Or try a super sweet Little Lamb Baby Lovey by Ashleigh Kiser!

3

Blankets

Gorgeous baby blankets have so many uses! Not only will they keep your little one warm, but they’re perfect for laying on the floor and creating the perfect place for your little one to play! For a simple pattern with bits of texture check out Little Moments by Fifty-Four Ten Studio (or their other free offerings!) Add some graphic elements with Chevron Blanket by Melissa Clulow. Or create a patchwork of color with Vivid by Tin Can Knits. If you’re looking for more traditional lace, try Baby Chalice Blanket by Karen Lauger. And for our crocheters try adding some colour with Bertie Baby Blanket by Little Dolally or go wild with Little Larksfoot Rainbow Blanket by Kristin Ballering!

4.png

Laundering Baby Items with Eucalan

Now that you’ve created some lovely items for baby, how can you keep them clean and germ-free? Check out our latest video on Laundering Baby Items with Eucalan. Whether they’re store-bought or handmade, keep every item that your baby touches fresh and clean with Eucalan!

 

Like this post? 

Pin it!

Crafting for Baby

The Dreaded M-word: Moth

Moths. The dreaded m-word that sends shudders down every crafter’s spine. We get a lot of questions on how to prevent moth damage to your handknits, as well as how to handle damage when it occurs and what to do if you find moths in your home. Today we’ve put together lots of information on how you can prevent and deal with fibre’s ultimate nemesis.

brown clothes moth sits on fabric closeup
First, let’s talk about moths. A moth infestation can be devastating, yet no one talks about it! But there’s nothing to be ashamed of. Even if you have the cleanest, most organized house in the world, moths can still be a problem.

Moth Prevention

So let’s talk about prevention. Moths love fibre, and particularly fibres that contain oils from your skin, as well as any spills or stains from food or other substances. So the first thing you can do to prevent moths is to wash your knitted items, particularly those worn directly in contact with your skin, fairly frequently. Also, you should always launder all items before packing them away for the season (i.e. wash your hats, mittens and sweaters before packing them away when winter is over). We suggest using Eucalan in either our Lavender or Eucalyptus as both scents are naturally moth repellent.

1

You can also store both fibres (yarns) and garments in clean, airtight containers. For yarn storage, we really like clear plastic tubs. These allow natural light in (moths love dark places) and keep bugs out. Any time you bring new yarn into the house, be sure that you place it in a clean, airtight container. To prevent any contamination, you may wish to place yarn in ziplock bags before you place them in tubs as an extra layer of protection. We also recommend the use of lavender sachets, cedar or other natural moth-repellents in those bins to stave off unwanted visitors. We NEVER recommend the use of mothballs as they are toxic to both humans and pets.

For garments, again we recommend airtight containers. You can use plastic tubs for garments as well, or many people use dresser drawers. Again, you should add lavender or some other scented sachets, or cedar (try cedar balls or blocks) to make your woollies less appetizing.

Our final recommendation is not strictly preventative, but more of an alarm system in case things go awry. To get some early warning in case you encounter moths, consider purchasing traps for clothes moths and placing them in areas where you store your fibre and garments. Again, the traps won’t prevent moths from entering your home, but these sticky pheromone traps will attract any moths that do. If you’re keeping a diligent eye on your traps, then you’re likely to notice as soon as a moth appears.

Dealing with Moths

Now that you’ve taken the above steps, let’s talk about what happens if moths do get into your fibre or garments. Let’s say you pull out your favourite sweater to find that it has one or two holes left by moths. First – don’t panic. It may be salvageable. The first thing that you want to do is quarantine the garment and make sure you kill the moth eggs that may still be lurking. You’re going to do this with the liberal application of heat or cold.

If you prefer cold, place the item in a ziplock bag and place it in your freezer (turn the temperature way down and try to keep the freezer frost-free) and allow it to remain at temperatures below freezing for 1-2 weeks. Then bring the item out of the freezer and allow it to come to room temperature. Repeat this process a few more times.

If you prefer heat, place the item in bags (dark trash bags work fine) in a car on a sunny day. The item should remain at temperatures above 120F for at least 30 minutes to kill any moth eggs. Note: you can also attempt to heat your yarn in the oven, but this is a little risky and requires constant attention. We prefer heating in a car, or freezing instead.

Once you have completed either of the two methods above, gently shake items and brush away any moth remnants.

Unfortunately, as you complete this process for the moth damaged item, you also need to examine each item stored near the first item, as well as other areas of your household. Any time you encounter moths you need to make a thorough inspection of your fibre and garments to ensure that none of the other items have been affected. Any items that you fear may have been affected should be subjected to all of the procedures we’ve described above. You will also need to do a thorough cleaning of any area affected including vacuuming, steam cleaning or wiping clean any surfaces that you believe moths have come into contact with.

This may take a while, and you will have to be vigilant. It isn’t fun, but it is necessary. There are other steps that you may need to take, up to and including consulting a pest control expert. We really like Haley’s post at Red-Handled Scissors for more tips on how to deal with clothes moths.

Once you have cleared your home of moths, then you can go back to our prevention tips (and monitoring with traps) to hopefully avoid future problems!

Dealing with Moth Damage

Once you have rid your house of moths, it’s time to consider what to do with moth-damaged items. Some may be beyond salvaging and you may need to dispose of these items. However, not all is lost. Last August we explored visible mending in Laundering and Mending Your Woolens. Since then we’ve also seen two wonderful books published: Visible Mending: Artful Stitchery to Repair and Refresh Your Favorite Things by Jenny Wilding Cardon and Mending Matters: Stitch, Patch, and Repair Your Favorite Denim and More by Katrina Rodabaugh. Both are excellent resources that may help you breathe new life into your affected garments.

2
Dealing with the M-word is never something we look forward to, but we hope we’ve given you a few tips and tricks on how to make your home less attractive to moths, as well as deal with the problem should it arise!

Like this post? Pin it!

M word(1)

Spring & Summer Crafting Inspiration

The weather is (finally) warming up! There are so many new knit and crochet patterns for spring and summer that you won’t want to pack away your needles and hooks for the season. Here, we share a few of our favourites to inspire your next project!

Tops and Tees

Spring and summer months are the perfect time to make lighter tops and tees in cottons and linens. These projects are more portable than bulky sweaters, and perfect to wear on warm summer days. Practice your crochet skills with Water Clover by Isa Catepillán, a runaway hit from the Spring 2019 issue of Pom Pom Quarterly. Or learn a new skill, Tunisian Crochet, with the Tunisian Drop Top by Stephanie Piper. Savour the hot sun with the Desert Tunic by Carrie Bostick Hoge or the Asymmetrical Tank by Norah Gaughan. Or just relax with some simple tees like Daybreak Tee by Destiny Meyer or Malaquite Tee by Amy Gunderson.

1

Sweaters & Cover-Ups

Even when the temperatures are soaring outside you may need a sweater to fend off the chill of air conditioning indoors. Or you can whip up a coverup for lounging in style near the pool or on the beach! We love Opportune by Emily Ringelman as a simple knit cover-up. The Cropped Eyelet Pullover by Laura Zukaite adds a bit of sass to any outfit. The Olive Leaf Pullover by Ririko is the perfect ¾ sleeve top for warmer days, and Belmonte by Filipa Carneiro is a sweet cardigan that works with any outfit. For our crocheters, we found this fabulous Crocheted Coverup by Cristina Mershon in the newest issue of Vogue, and the Coffee Cup Pullover by Lee Sartori.

2
Shawls and Scarves

Whether you’re looking for a show-stopping piece to add to your wardrobe, a light shawl to throw over your shoulders or the perfect accessory to accent summer outfits, we’ve found some hot new shawls for you! We can’t get over the stunning Wingspan by Kyle Vey! Tasha by Kirstin Omdahl adds a touch of lace to your spring and summer knits, and Eclecticity by Cheryl Faust adds luscious texture. The Desert Sunset Shawl by Amy Christoffers could be a great stashbuster and a fun way to add colour to your day, and the Jewel Wrap by Carmen Heffernan does the same with crochet. If you’re looking for a delicate piece for evening wear, we love From the Ashes by Rachy Newin.

Euc Graphics

If you choose to knit or crochet one of the lacier patterns above, check out our tips on How to Wet Block Lace with Eucalan.

Socks

Socks are the perfect summer project because they’re small and portable and usually only require one ball of yarn at a time. If lace is what you’re after, we love the new Composition Socks by Mone Dräger. For a bit more texture, check out the Carmanah Toe-Up Socks by Catherine Knuttson. Stitch a pair of delicate summer socks with some pretty pink yarn and settle into the Summer Blooms Socks by Thistle Glen Designs or XO Socks by Leeni Hoi. If you’re up for some colourwork fun, check out the Avo Toast Socks by SpillyJane in the newest issue of Interweave Knits! And if you’re looking for an easy “vanilla” sock to make, spice it up with some self-striping sock yarn and grab your free copy of Trusty Toe Up Socks by Tanis Lavalee.

4

We hope we’ve given you some inspiration to keep crafting this spring and summer. With any of the projects above – don’t forget to block! Wet blocking with a bit of Eucalan smooths out all the lumps and bumps and gives you a clean, fresh garment that smells great. We’ve got you covered!

Like this post? Pin it!

Euc Spring Summer

Wet Blocking Crocheted Lace: Morgana Shawl Tips

In our last blog post, we shared the stunning FREE crochet pattern from Kristin Omdahl for the Morgana Crocheted Shawl. If you haven’t picked up your free copy of the pattern yet, you can do so by signing up for our newsletter right here. The pattern will be emailed to you right away!

Kristin has put together a video that shows exactly how to wet block and finish crocheted lace, which is helpful to any crocheter, regardless of whether you are making the Morgana shawl or not.  It features Eucalan Wrapture, the jasmine-scented delicate wash we developed with Kristin herself! Check out her amazing video right here:

If you are unsure about your crochet skills, the stitches, or wet blocking crocheted lace, Kristin has a whole series of really helpful videos to walk you through every step of the Morgana Shawl.

Happy Crocheting!

Like this post? Pin It!

Free Crochet Pattern! Morgana Shawl

The phenomenal Kristin Omdahl has created a beautiful 3-colour crochet shawl pattern- the Morgana shawl!

This shawl features alternating stripes of light turquoise, leaf green, and lavender. The colours are perfect for spring and summer, but of course it would also look beautiful crocheted in a single colour. Perhaps your new go-to accessory this year?

It’s a free pattern for our newsletter subscribers! All you have to do to get a copy of the pattern is sign up here, and the full pattern pdf will be in your inbox really quickly.

To make a shawl just like the one shown, you’ll need a Tidbit Trio kit by Kristin Omdahl Yarns– the yarn is 100% bamboo, so very breathable and has a lovely sheen to it. There are all sorts of colour choices for the yarn, so have fun combining your favourites into something that is completely you!

Kristin is also the wonder behind Wrapture, our jasmine scented wash. Naturally, we recommend you use Wrapture for wet blocking your shawl when it’s done, as lace really looks its best once it’s been blocked. Kristin has put together videos on how to do this, as well as how to read a crochet chart and work the edging- find them all right here.

You can also read Kristin’s blog post about the shawl she designed right here!

Like this post? Pin it!

Wet Blocking Knits: Tips and Tricks

There are lots of different ways to block knitted and crocheted items, but they all share many similarities. Here are some fantastic ways to block your knits- and you’ll definitely pick up some new tips. We’ve been fortunate to have some great reviews and love from all sorts of crafty bloggers, and we thought it would be great to share the tips and tricks for blocking your knits that have featured Eucalan!

How to Spray Block Your Knit and Crocheted Items. The Spray technique is a great way to cut down on drying time dramatically. Read all about it here.

Top Tips for Blocking Your Knits, from the famous London Loop yarn shop. Especially great tips for blocking lace, and swatches.

3 Different Ways to Block Your Knits – knits that need to be seamed, items made in the round, and the speedy steam blocking method- all great techniques.

How to Wet Block a Sweater, from Flax & Twine. Wet blocking larger items like a sweater takes a bit of effort, and this is a great step-by-step.

Knitting Expat has a great tutorial on how she wet blocks her knits, and her towel method for removing excess water after wet blocking is a must-do.

How to wet block a hat- hats can be tricky, but this is a great tutorial. With a little bit of guidance, you can do it!

Speaking of wet blocking hats,  knitted tams have their own challenges – here’s a great tutorial on wet blocking a tam (you need a plate!)

Are there any blocking tutorials you would like to see that we haven’t covered? Let us know in the comments!

Like this post? Pin it!

 

Meet the Shibaguyz

The-Shibaguyz-Together-2--July-2015_with_watermarkWe are proud to sponsor Shibaguyz Designz, a company that integrates fashion design, crochet, knitting, photography, and graphic design all under one roof. The design studio is comprised of  Shannon and Jason, who live in Seattle, Washington with their three Shiba Inu. Today, we interviewed Shannon to learn more about this duo’s many creative endeavors.

How did you learn to knit? Crochet?
All the members of my family were makers, from knitting and crochet, to woodworking and quilting, it was expected that we all learn some kind of art. Although all of the women in my family crocheted and knitted, my grandmother was the strongest influence in getting me started. The first actual memory I have is of sitting next to her on the couch and her teaching me to make bookmarks and circles that turned into hats. Pretty much anything I could do to hang out with her made it okay with me. The first projects she taught me to make were those little spiral bookmarks and “draft dodgers” that you put at the base of doors and windows. Then there was the year that everyone got a pair of slippers from me because I had learned to crochet, knit, AND sew.

You know how it goes… first it’s an innocent bookmark, and then, suddenly, you’re the only guy in your class who can make thread lace doll dresses. Wait… was that just me?

I have to point out here that I’m an only half of the Shibaguyz. Jason is also very creative and, besides being the talented photography and graphic design genius behind four of our books, he is also a FAB spinner, he sews, cooks and has just started weaving. He is one of only two people who do the finishing on all of our designs… me being the other person. We make a great team… if I do say so myself…

Jason at Work

Jason at Work


What is the process like for creating a new design or collection of new designs?
I start my process one of two ways: I’ll either sketch the design, something that’s been wandering around in the corners of my brain waiting to be born, then I’ll start looking for the fiber and stitch pattern that will create the fabric I have in mind. The other way happens when I’m swatching for a new design and create a fabric that I LOVE but might not be right for that particular design. I’ll file that fabric swatch away (or keep in on my desk to remind me that I like it) then think about a garment that this fabric will work perfectly for.

It all comes down to the fabric for me… the fabric created by the yarn and stitch pattern must match the vision of the final garment in my head… crochet or knit… it’s all down to the fabric.

Cables and Lace Tunic

Cables and Lace Tunic

What is the best part about being a multicraftual team?
The best part?  Nothing is out of reach… whatever pops into my head I can do. Crochet a dress, knit a pullover, piece together a throw quilt, or sew a shirt.  There are no limits… and with Jason being able to spin, weave, and cook like a four-star chef we pretty much have it all covered!

What is your all-time favorite Shibaguyz design?
That’s a bit like asking Carol Brady which of her children she loves the most… I just can’t answer it. I love something special about every design I make. I love to look at the texture of the crochet stitches in the T-Top from Crochet Geometry as much as the delicate thread motifs from the Motif Maxi Skirt from Designer Crochet or the simplicity of my knit “Cowl Neck Poncho.” Each is completely different (like Cindy, Jan, and Marcia…) but for different reasons and I derive little pleasures from seeing each detail and each nuance of the designs.

That said… I will admit that the designs from my last two books, Crochet Geometry, and Designer Crochet, are designs that I’d saved for my own publication instead of selling the rights for. Some of the patterns are designs I’d been thinking of making for years but just couldn’t bear to part with them. So I kept them until we met the right publisher and we had a chance to put them into our own books the way we wanted them to me presented.

Crochet Geometry and Designer Crochet, both by Shannon Mullett-Bowlsby

Crochet Geometry and Designer Crochet, both by Shannon Mullett-Bowlsby

For our readers who might not know, tell us a little bit more about the Shibaguyz Designz Studio.
Shibguyz Designz is comprised of myself and Jason, my husband. I’m a fashion designer specializing in crochet and hand knit fabrics. Jason is a photographer and graphic designer. Together we fill in the areas to make one cohesive whole…

Jason’s studio is on the 2nd floor of our townhouse. He has a plethora of camera equipment, and graphic design tools strewn about… you’ll also find Atlas, one of our Shiba Inus, sitting on a chair close by as Jason is rarely allowed out of his visual range.

My studio is on the 3rd floor (what once was a spare bedroom). Right now my studio looks like… like a department store the day after a clearance sale. I just finished up with our previous book so everything I needed to have on hand to finish it is close by. I have sketches hanging on the wall pinned with swatches, bins of rejected swatches sitting on my rocking chair (I LOVE rocking chairs!) and couch (where the other two Shibas, Apollo and Dallas, keep me company), inspiration yarn on the shelves next to me along with test yarn, test patterns, my empty coffee mug (that reminds me, I need to make more coffee), and a couple of chocolate bar wrappers that I think are empty now (that reminds me to tell Jason I’m out of chocolate). On my desk you can find paper with calculations, reference books, more swatches (I swatch a LOT) and somewhere in there I have a computer… surrounding me there are dress forms with muslin mock-ups draped on them, stitched projects pinned to blocking mats. All in all, not bad.

There was a joke going around for the longest time about our ‘Yarn Tub.” We have a guest bath outside my studio door that acts as storage for yarn once my inventory gets a tad bit much. Jason occasionally teases that I need to crawl in the tub and take a yarn bath. I’ve considered it more than once (don’t judge me).

The Shiba Pupz

The Shiba Pupz

Why do you prefer Eucalan to care for your finished designs? Have you discovered any other uses for Eucalan outside of the yarn world?
There are so many reasons I use Eucalan… First, when creating fabric from yarn, which is what we as stitchers do, I have to know what the final product will be like once it is washed. Remember that many fibers can’t take a lot of abuse and the fact that Eucalan, being a gentle wash that does not have to be rinsed and can be left in, is perfect for everything I do from blocking swatches to washing completed garments. The no-rinse factor also makes it perfect because it cuts down on processing time when we have a LOT of swatches to block or garments to finish. Bottom line, the product works… it cleans with a minimum amount of stress on the fibers.

Second, I am scent sensitive and have some contact sensitivity “issues” with my skin. Most commercial fabric washes have artificial fragrances added which cause me to break out or have problems breathing… not a good thing for someone who likes to breathe. When we spoke to the folks at Eucalan about this and found out y’all use natural fragrances derived from essential oils, we were hopeful. When we actually used the products and they didn’t affect my breathing or my skin, we were downright doing a happy dance. The fragrances are mild and leave everything just smelling fresh and clean.

Shannon Teaching Knit Fit 2014

Shannon Teaching Knit Fit 2014

And funny you ask about other uses. We travel around the country a lot teaching at events and fiber festivals. Sometimes packing enough clothes for both of us along with teaching supplies, camera equipment, shoes… gotta have our shoes… can be an issue. On a recent teaching trip to STITCHES West, I had a mishap with a tall flat white and one of his shirts needed washed out. Jason had packed one of the Eucalan Getaway Gang travel kits in my bag so I gave it a try. LOVE LOVE LOVE how easy it was to just rinse out my shirt while I got ready for dinner that night and the shirt was ready to go the next day without a stain. THEN we were on an airplane to Pittsburgh and you know those little half and half containers they give you with your coffee? This particular one was under pressure and spewed half and half all over us in tiny little droplets. Those nifty little Eucalan Wipes took care of the droplets and didn’t stain my favorite traveling jacket (dark blue linen blend… yeah… shoes and suit jackets… it’s a thing with me). We’ve used the wipes on stains on the couch and even just used some on a damp cloth for larger spills on a chair when we didn’t want to get out the big cleaner with that weird hose. No rinse… no stain. Yes… we’re big fans. We travel a lot and we live with three very active Shiba Inu so we have plenty of chances to put Eucalan to the test. Eucalan fits perfectly into our studio and our life.

FIligree Lace Tunic by Shibaguyz Designz

FIligree Lace Tunic by Shibaguyz Designz

Crafty Back-to-School!

As summer winds down and the kids head back to school, our thoughts have turned to more fibre-y pursuits here at Eucalan. Perhaps it was all the fun of last weekend’s Twist Fibre Festival (which we sponsored for its third year running), or maybe it’s all of the great new patterns coming out right now in anticipation of cooler temperatures. Either way, we are looking forward to getting crafty in the months to come, and today we’ll be sharing some of our favourite inspirations to stitch this month with a back-to-school theme!

pencilsWe’re loving these clever knitting projects based on the iconic yellow no. 2 pencil! From L-R above:  Sinuous Pencil Scarf by Alice Humbracht (note: we also found a crochet version here on Ravelry!), No. 2 Pencil Socks by the Yarn Enabler, Arthur by Anna Hrachovec.

pencilcaseCROCHETOf course, every well-organized student needs a pencil case, and these whimsical crochet patterns are sure to make studying fun! From L-R above: Pencil Cases by Ana Paula Rimoli, Mister Snaps by Irene Strange,  Robot Pencil Case by Sincerely Pam.

btsSEWThere are lots of creative organizational ideas to sew for back-to-school, and these two free tutorials we discovered via AllFreeSewing.com are simple enough to whip up in a jiffy! Left: Composition Book Cover Tutorial by V and Co.; Right: Crayon Zip Bag by The Good Weekly.

needlepointFor fans on needlepoint, we discovered these amusing projects via Pinterest which cover both ends of the spectrum when it comes to packing a school lunch. Left: Eat Your Veggies by Athena and Eugenia; Right: Darth Vader by DorkStitch.

For more back-to-school inspirations, check out our Pinterest board here!

Catching up with Kristin Omdahl

Knit and crochet designer Kristin Omdahl has been keeping busy this summer! Her latest endeavor is her own line of beautiful yarn called Bamboo So Fine. This lustrous and silky yarn pairs perfectly with Eucalan’s Wrapture by Kristin Omdahl, which is infused with the intoxicating aroma of night-blooming jasmine. Each skein of yarn has generous yardage and comes in your choice of exquisite colors; Kristin also includes patterns and a sample of Wrapture with each purchase!

BSF_amethystad

 

Most knitters and crocheters find that long crafting sessions leave their hands feeling dry, so we recommend adding a tin of our Wrapture Fragrant Balm to your knitting bag! This emollient product absorbs quickly, leaving your skin moisturised without any residue that could transfer to your project. It’s great for taming cuticles and rough patches, plus you can apply to your pulse points for a pleasing natural fragrance.

If you’re curious to learn more about Wrapture Fragrant Balm, check out this recent product review on the Rock + Purl Podcast to learn more!