Washing Oversized Items with Eucalan

Christmas is over, the new year is around the corner, and we know you’re breathing a sigh of relief that you’ve survived another holiday season! If your house needs some attention after the holiday festivities, today we’re going to focus on how to clean oversized items such as blankets, quilts, and comforters with Eucalan.

Spot Cleaning

For specific problem areas on oversized items, Eucalan is great for spot cleaning. First, check for colour fastness on whatever you plan to clean. Then, ask yourself if the item has been washed before – if this is its first washing, there is an increased possibility of colours running or bleeding.

To test for colour-fastness, place a swatch of the fabric or yarn in a jar with water and a small amount of Eucalan. Shake the jar and see if the water changes colour and how many suds you get. Alternatively, you can dampen an inside seam, wait a minute or two and blot with a white cotton cloth. If colour appears, use caution. Most dyes used on yarn are reactive dyes and stand up to washing in 120 degree Fahrenheit water; if a yarn was dyed at a high temperature it can stand up to that temperature without shrinking or fading.

For spot cleaning, treat any problem areas with full-strength Eucalan. If you’re looking for more information about how to treat specific stains, sign up for our newsletter and get a free pdf download of our handy new Guide to Stain Removal!

Washing

If you have a washing machine big enough to handle a quilt or comforter, the good news is that you can use Eucalan in the washer!

If you have a top loading machine, set your washing machine to the delicate cycle and fill the drum with cool water. Add approximately 4 tablespoons of Eucalan for a large quilt or comforter. Then submerge the item in the drum and run through the gentle or handwash cycle.

If you have a front loading machine, place your item in the drum. Set the machine to the delicate cycle and cool water. Add 4 tablespoons of Eucalan to the detergent compartment and run the cycle.

Drying

To dry your oversized item, you have two options. First, you can hang it to dry – just make sure it’s away from direct sunlight which can cause whites to yellow or colours to fade. Your second option is to machine dry, provided your materials will stand up to tumble drying. Set the dryer to low or cool air and dry the quilt or comforter gently; it’s important to avoid high heat so that your items don’t shrink.

Extra Care for Woolens

If the item you’re washing is wool, you may need to stick to handwashing to avoid agitating, felting or shrinking. If you’re concerned about using the washing machine, your best bet is to fill a large tub or basin with cool water and add anywhere between a capful to 4 tablespoons of Eucalan, depending on the size of your blanket. Then gently submerge your blanket in the water, pressing gently to ensure that the blanket is completely wet. Avoid agitating the blanket to prevent any felting of the wool fibers. Leave the blanket in the tub or basin for approximately 15-20 minutes. Then drain the water, and press the blanket gently to release excess water. Take care to avoid squeezing and wringing the blanket so as not to cause friction, or to stretch it out of shape. If your washer has the option to do a spin cycle only, you may wish to place your blanket in the washer to spin additional water out. Otherwise, roll the blanket in clean, dry towels to absorb any moisture.

Once you have gotten as much excess water as you can out of your blanket, you can dry it using the instructions above, or gently lay it out on more clean, dry towels, press it into shape, and let it dry.

We hope that we’ve helped you conquer some of the oversized items on your to do list!

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